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The Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada (OPC) generates privacy research in a few ways. It conducts in-house research, commissions expert research and provides funding for independent research projects. In addition, the OPC regularly conducts public opinion research with Canadians, Canadian businesses and other audiences to stay abreast of privacy awareness, understanding, attitudes and perceptions.

By funding privacy research that draws from, and includes, Canadian perspectives, we help generate information, insights, analysis, and in some instances, debate—all of which contribute to the protection and promotion of privacy.

Start here to explore the wealth of privacy research on the OPC web site.

Research paper

The Limits of Reasonableness: The Failures of the Conventional Search and Seizure Paradigm In Information-Rich Environments

Paper by Craig Forcese: ‘The Limits of Reasonableness: The Failures of the Conventional Search and Seizure Paradigm In Information-Rich Environments’

Research paper

Connected things, privacy and public space: Approach to a taxonomy

Paper by Adam Greenfield: 'Connected things, privacy and public space: Approach to a taxonomy'

Research paper

Privacy and Developing Countries

Research paper about the key dynamics of policy processes surrounding privacy in developing countries.

Research paper

From Protection to Empowerment: Reframing the Conversation on Youth Privacy Education

Paper by Matthew Johnson: 'From Protection to Empowerment: Reframing the Conversation on Youth Privacy Education'

Research paper

Why Privacy Matters

Paper by Christena Nippert-Eng, Ph.D: 'Why Privacy Matters'

Research paper

Youth Don't Care?: Reflecting on North American Youth Online Privacy Research

Paper by Kate Raynes-Goldie:'Youth Don't Care?: Reflecting on North American Youth Online Privacy Research'

Research paper

Vanishing Surveillance: Why Seeing What is Watching Us Matters

Paper by David Murakami Wood: 'Vanishing Surveillance: Why Seeing What is Watching Us Matters'

Research paper

Surveillance Technologies and Children

Research paper summarizing existing research on the effects of technical surveillance on children.

Research paper
Research paper

The Actuarial Relevance of Genetic Information in the Life and Health Insurance Context

Paper by Angus Macdonald: 'The Actuarial Relevance of Genetic Information in the Life and Health Insurance Context'

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