Research

Public Opinion Surveys

Canadians and Privacy
Final Report

Submitted to:
Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada Communications
Place de Ville 112 Kent Street, Suite 300
Ottawa, Ontario
K1A 1H3

EKOS RESEARCH ASSOCIATES INC.
March 2009


Table of contents

Executive Summary

1. Background and Methodology

2. Privacy and Personal Information

3. New Technologies and Privacy Concerns

4. Privacy and Security

5. Identity Integrity and Protection

APPENDIX A: Survey Questionnaire (English and French)

Top of PageTable of ContentsExecutive Summary

The Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada (OPC) is an advocate for the privacy rights of Canadians with the power to investigate the handling of personal information in both the public and private sectors. With more and more Canadians embracing new technology and its potential to change our daily interactions with people, governments and businesses, there remains a significant need to ensure that personal information is kept safe and secure from any unauthorized use. In order to assist the public in the protection of personal information, there is an ongoing need to understand how the Canadian public’s views on privacy issues continue to evolve in this increasingly complex environment.

The OPC commissioned EKOS Research Associates to undertake a survey of Canadians to better gauge their understanding and awareness of privacy issues, legislation and federal privacy institutions. Questions focussed on four strategic priority areas established by the Office: (i) information technology and privacy; (ii) national security and privacy; (iii) identity integrity and protection; and (iv) genetic privacy. In each of these areas, the research examined levels of awareness, understanding and concerns, and where available, results were tracked from earlier studies examining public views on these issues.

The study involved a telephone survey with a random sample of 2,028 Canadians, aged 16 years or older. The results are valid within a margin of error of ? 2.2 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Key findings from the study are outlined below and are described in more detail in later sections of this report.

Privacy and Personal Information

Respondents were first asked if they were aware of any federal institutions that help Canadians deal with privacy and the protection of personal information from inappropriate collection, use and disclosure. Results reveal that a majority of Canadians (66 per cent) continue to say they are unaware of any institutions that help protect personal information (although this is down 11 percentage points since 2007). The proportion of Canadians who say they are clearly aware of such institutions currently stands at 15 per cent (up from eight per cent in 2007), and about one in five (18 per cent) say they are vaguely aware of institutions dealing with privacy.

Respondents who claimed some awareness of federal institutions dealing with the protection of personal information and privacy were asked to identify, unprompted, the federal institutions with which they are familiar. About one in five of these respondents (18 per cent) name the Office of the Privacy Commissioner, making it the institution most often cited by respondents, although this is down somewhat from previous years.

Canadians were also asked to rate how well they protect the privacy of their personal information. Results suggest that Canadians are becoming more vigilant about guarding their personal information: one in five (20 per cent) say they do a very good job of protecting their privacy (up from 17 per cent in 2006), and over half (56 per cent) rate the job they’re doing to protect their personal information as good (up three percentage points since 2006). Only six per cent of Canadians feel they are doing a poor (five per cent) or very poor (one per cent) job of protecting their personal information.

Results also reveal a general concern among Canadians about the protection of personal information and privacy, and a lack of confidence that businesses and organizations can adequately safeguard this information. The majority (62 per cent) agree that protecting personal information will be one of the most important issues facing Canadians in the next ten years, and almost half (47 per cent) are concerned that the focus on security in the wake of the 9/11 terrorist attacks will unnecessarily restrict the privacy and civil liberties of Canadian citizens. Moreover, only one-third of Canadians (34 per cent) are confident that companies have adequate mechanisms in place to safeguard the personal information of Canadians.

The majority of Canadians (71 per cent) also feel that strong privacy laws to protect their personal information is a matter of high importance, and one-quarter (27 per cent) see this as a moderately important issue. Only one per cent of Canadians consider strong privacy laws to be of little importance to them.

New Technologies and Privacy Concerns

Respondents were asked if they felt that they had enough information to understand how new technologies might affect their personal privacy. Results reveal that Canadians are somewhat less confident about this issue than they were a few years ago: while the plurality of Canadians (45 per cent) continue to feel that they do have enough information to know how their privacy could be affected by new technologies, this is down from 51 per cent in 2007. One-third of Canadians (33 per cent) feel that they do not have sufficient knowledge to assess the impact of new technologies on their privacy, and one in five (20 per cent) are neutral on the subject.

Results further reveal fairly high levels of concern about the impact of new technologies on privacy: almost half of Canadians (48 per cent) say they are somewhat concerned about this issue, and another 42 per cent say they are very concerned. Only one in ten (nine per cent) say they are not concerned about the impact of new technologies on privacy.

Respondents were also asked to rate their ability to take appropriate precautions to protect their personal information and ensure that using the Internet is as safe as possible. Overall, Canadians show a fairly high degree of confidence in their abilities to protect themselves online, with over half (54 per cent) rating themselves as doing a good job, and only one in seven (15 per cent) feeling they do a poor job of safeguarding their personal information while online.

Genetic Privacy

Turning to views on genetic privacy, results suggest that Canadians are divided in their views on whether genetic testing raises any privacy concerns. Half of Canadians (51 per cent) believe that genetic testing does raise issues around privacy, while over four in ten (45 per cent) feel that it does not.

Those respondents who indicated they were concerned about genetic testing and privacy issues were asked, unprompted, to name any privacy issues related to genetic testing that is of particular concern to them. The plurality of these respondents (31 per cent) could not specify any particular issue of concern. Among those able to provide a response, one in five (18 per cent) mentioned concerns about confidentiality and privacy of this information, and a further 12 per cent worry that results of genetic testing might be used for unintended purposes.

Results further reveal that over two-thirds of Canadians (68 per cent) oppose the use of genetic testing to determine who is insurable and at what premiums, and only one in ten (10 per cent) support this idea. Even stronger disagreement is expressed when asked whether employers should be able to use genetic tests to make hiring and promotion decisions: more than eight in ten Canadians (83 per cent) oppose such practices, while only one in ten (11 per cent) are in favour.

Privacy and Security

Survey results also suggest that Canadians feel personal privacy is an important consideration as governments provide law enforcement and intelligence agencies with enhanced powers. Nine in ten feel it is very (45 per cent) or somewhat (45 per cent) important that privacy considerations factor into decisions about enhanced security powers for law enforcement agencies, and fewer than one in ten view this issue as having little importance.

Canadians were also asked how confident they are that new security measures at borders and airports result in increased safety and security. Only one in five (20 per cent) say they are very confident that new security measures result in increased safety and security, however, a clear majority (62 per cent) say they are moderately confident. Only one in six (17 per cent) express no confidence in the impact of new security measures to increase the safety and security of Canadians.

When asked how confident they are that Canadian law enforcement and security agencies adhere to privacy laws that restrict the collection, storage, and sharing of personal information, results reveal some scepticism in this area: only about one in seven Canadians (15 per cent) are very confident that authorities respect the laws that protect Canadians’ privacy; however, most (66 per cent) are moderately confident that this is the case. Only one in six (17 per cent) have little confidence that privacy rules are being followed by law enforcement agencies.

Identity Integrity and Protection

Turning to another topic, respondents were asked if they had ever been a victim of identity theft. Results suggest that the vast majority of Canadians (83 per cent) have not experienced identity theft, although over one in six (16 per cent) say they have. Interestingly, despite fairly limited first hand experience with this issue, almost half of Canadians (49 per cent) say that they are very concerned about identity theft, and 44 per cent are somewhat concerned; only six per cent of Canadians say they are not concerned about this issue.

Respondents were also asked whether they had ever taken specific actions to protect their personal information, such as requesting to see personal information about themselves maintained by the government or a business, ordering a copy of their credit report, or declining to provide personal information to a business. Half (51 per cent) say they have refused to share personal information with a business, however, fewer than one in five say they have verified their credit report for accuracy (18 per cent), and an even smaller number have asked to see personal information about them kept by a business (13 per cent) or the government (10 per cent).

Results also suggest that Canadians’ comfort with sharing personal information varies depending on the situation. The vast majority of Canadians (84 per cent) are not comfortable providing personal information to a telemarketer, and six in ten (61 per cent) are uncomfortable sharing personal information on social networking sites. However, only one-third (35 per cent) are uncomfortable providing personal information in transactions over the Internet, and just one in four (27 per cent) are uncomfortable with providing this type of information to a business or organization as part of a customer loyalty program.

Results further suggest that Canadians take precautions to protect their personal information. An overwhelming majority of Canadians (92 per cent) say they make a point of reviewing their credit card and bank statements to ensure there are no unauthorized purchases, and 71 per cent say they keep track of when their statements should arrive each month. A further 85 per cent of Canadians say they shred or destroy documents that contain personal information. In addition, almost half of all Canadians (48 per cent) say they refrain from carrying sensitive documents (e.g., SIN card, passport) with them on a daily basis.

Finally, respondents were asked whether political parties and politicians should be subject to legislation that sets out rules for how they collect and handle the personal information of Canadian citizens. An overwhelming majority of Canadians (92 per cent) feel that political parties and politicians should be subject to such legislation, while a scant six per cent think they should not.

Top of PageTable of Contents1. Background and Methodology

The Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada (OPC) is an advocate for the privacy rights of Canadians with the power to investigate the handling of personal information in both the public and private sectors. With more and more Canadians embracing new technology and its potential to change our daily interactions with people, governments and businesses, there remains a significant need to ensure that personal information is kept safe and secure from any unauthorized use. In order to assist the public in the protection of personal information, there is an ongoing need to understand how the Canadian public’s views on privacy issues continue to evolve in this increasingly complex environment.

The OPC commissioned EKOS Research Associates to undertake a survey of Canadians to better gauge their understanding and awareness of privacy issues, legislation and federal privacy institutions. Questions focussed on four strategic priority areas established by the Office: (i) information technology and privacy; (ii) national security and privacy; (iii) identity integrity and protection; and (iv) genetic privacy. In each of these areas, the research examined levels of awareness, understanding and concerns, and where available, results were tracked from earlier studies examining public views on these issues.

The study involved a telephone survey with a random sample of 2,028 Canadians, aged 16 years or older. The results are valid within a margin of error of ? 2.2 percentage points, 19 times out of 20. This margin of error increases for population sub-group results (e.g., age, region, gender). Surveying was undertaken between February 23 and March 9, 2009. The survey was conducted across Canada in both official languages.

This report presents the findings from the survey. Survey findings are divided into a number of sections, each of which contains a descriptive presentation of the results, and a discussion of key differences among population sub-groups for all questions included in the survey.

Top of PageTable of Contents2. Privacy and Personal Information

2.1 Awareness of Federal Institutions

Respondents were first asked if they were aware of any federal institutions that help Canadians deal with privacy and the protection of personal information from inappropriate collection, use and disclosure. Results reveal that a majority of Canadians (66 per cent) continue to say they are unaware of any institutions that help protect personal information (although this is down 11 percentage points since 2007). The number of Canadians who say they are clearly aware of such institutions currently stands at 15 per cent (up from eight per cent in 2007), and about one in five (18 per cent) say they are vaguely aware of institutions dealing with privacy.

  • Regionally, Ontario residents are more likely to indicate clear awareness of federal institutions that help Canadians protect their personal information (18 per cent). Conversely, Quebec residents are more likely to indicate no awareness of federal institutions protecting Canadians’ privacy (74 per cent).
  • Canadians between 45 and 64 years of age express higher levels of clear awareness of federal institutions that deal with the protection of personal information (21 per cent). Conversely, almost eight in ten (78 per cent) Canadians aged 25 and under are unaware of any such institutions.
  • Canadians with annual household incomes of $100,000 or more (22 per cent), and those with university education (23 per cent) are particularly likely to cite a clear awareness of federal institutions dealing with privacy and protection of personal information.

Chart - Awareness of Federal Institutions

2.2 Awareness of Specific Federal Institutions

Respondents who claimed some awareness of federal institutions dealing with the protection of personal information and privacy were asked to identify, unprompted, the federal institutions with which they are familiar. Almost one in five of these respondents (18 per cent) name the Office of the Privacy Commissioner, making it the institution most often cited by respondents; however, this is down somewhat from previous years. One in ten respondents (10 per cent) cite consumer protection agencies, up from just three per cent in 2005. Awareness of other institutions such as law enforcement and the Canada Revenue Agency has remained relatively stable over the past five years, at or around four per cent. In keeping with results from previous years, fully half of these respondents (50 per cent) did not offer a response to this question.

  • Regionally, awareness of the Office of the Privacy Commissioner is highest among residents of Ontario (23 per cent), and lowest in Quebec (nine per cent).

Chart - Awareness of Specific Federal Institutions (1)

Chart - Awareness of Specific Federal Institutions (2)

2.3 Knowledge of Privacy Rights

Respondents were also asked to rate their knowledge of individual privacy rights under the laws that protect their personal information. The number who consider themselves very well informed remains low (four per cent), however, a fairly large proportion of Canadians (24 per cent) rate their knowledge of privacy rights as good (up from 16 per cent in 2007). At the same time, the number of Canadians who rate their knowledge of privacy rights as poor is now 27 per cent (down nine percentage points since 2007), and the proportion who consider their knowledge very poor now stands at eight per cent (down from 23 per cent in 2001).

  • Respondents in British Columbia rate their knowledge of privacy rights lower than their regional counterparts, with 31 per cent saying their knowledge is poor (compared to 27 per cent nationally); similarly, only 17 per cent of British Columbia residents rate their knowledge as good.
  • Respondents aged 25 to 44 are less likely to feel their knowledge of privacy rights is good (20 per cent, vs. 24 per cent nationally).
  • Canadians earning less than $20,000 in annual income are more likely to rate their knowledge of privacy rights as very poor (13 per cent).

Chart - Knowledge of Privacy Rights

2.4 Rating Own Protection of Personal Information

Survey results suggest that Canadians are becoming more vigilant about guarding their personal information: one in five (20 per cent) say they do a very good job of protecting their privacy (up from 17 per cent in 2006), and over half (56 per cent) rate the job they’re doing to protect their personal information as good (up three percentage points since 2006). Only six per cent of Canadians feel they are doing a poor (five per cent) or very poor (one per cent) job of protecting their personal information.

  • Quebec residents are somewhat less likely than other Canadians to rate themselves as doing a very good job in guarding their personal information (16 per cent, vs. 20 per cent nationally).
  • Canadians over the age of 65 are particularly likely to feel they are doing a very good job of protecting their personal information (27 per cent).

Chart - Rating Own Protection of Personal Information

2.5 Views on Privacy and Security

Survey results also reveal a general concern among Canadians about the protection of personal information and privacy, and a lack of confidence that businesses and organizations can adequately safeguard this information. The majority (62 per cent) agree that protecting personal information will be one of the most important issues facing Canadians in the next ten years, and almost half (47 per cent) are concerned that the focus on security in the wake of the 9/11 terrorist attacks will unnecessarily restrict the privacy and civil liberties of Canadian citizens. Moreover, only one-third of Canadians (34 per cent) are confident that companies have adequate mechanisms in place to safeguard the personal information of Canadians.

  • Regionally, residents of British Columbia express a greater concern about the impact of security measures on Canadians’ privacy and civil liberties (56 per cent, vs. 47 per cent nationally).
  • Those with higher incomes and education levels have less confidence in the safeguards of businesses and other organizations.
  • British Columbia residents are particularly unlikely to feel that businesses have adequate security safeguards in place to protect personal information (25 per cent, vs. 34 per cent nationally).
  • Those under 25 years of age have the most confidence in the ability of businesses to protect personal information (47 per cent), while Canadians aged 45 to 64 are less likely to agree with this idea (27 per cent).

Chart - Views on Privacy and Security

2.6 Protection of Personal Information Compared to Ten Years Ago

Respondents were asked whether they agreed that they had less protection of their personal information than they did ten years ago. Results reveal that the majority of Canadians (60 per cent) feel that their information is less protected than it was ten years ago, although this is down from 71 per cent in 2005. Disagreement with this idea how stands at 23 per cent (up from 15 per cent in 2005).

  • Residents in Quebec are less likely than other Canadians to feel that they have less protection than they did ten years ago (52 per cent, vs. 60 per cent nationally). Conversely, British Columbia and Alberta residents are more likely to feel their information is less protected than it was ten years ago (66 per cent and 68 per cent, respectively).
  • Canadians under 25 are much less likely to believe their personal information is less protected than it was ten years ago (38 per cent). Conversely, Canadians between 45 and 64 years of age are more likely to feel they have less protection of their personal information than they did ten years ago (67 per cent).
  • Those with university education are more likely to feel their personal information is more vulnerable than it was ten years ago (68 per cent).

Chart - Protection of Personal Information Compared to Ten Years Ago

2.7 Importance of Strong Privacy Laws

Respondents were asked how important it was to them personally to have strong laws in place to protect Canadians’ personal information. The majority (71 per cent) see it as a matter of high importance, although this is down nine percentage points since 2007. Over one-quarter (27 per cent) see it as an issue of moderate importance, and a scant one per cent consider it a matter of low importance.

  • Quebec residents are particularly likely to place a high level of importance on having strong laws to protect personal information (77 per cent). Conversely, British Columbia and Alberta residents are less inclined to rank the issue as highly important (63 per cent and 64 per cent, respectively).
  • Three in four women (75 per cent) see strong privacy laws as a matter of high importance, compared to two-thirds of men (67 per cent).
  • Canadians 45 to 64 years of age are particularly likely to feel that it is very important that Canada has strong laws to protect their personal information (78 per cent). Conversely, Canadians under 25 are less likely to feel this is very important (61 per cent).

Chart - Importance of Strong Privacy Laws

2.8 Seriousness Governments Take in Protecting Personal Information

Respondents were asked how seriously they think the federal government takes its responsibility to protect the personal information of Canadian citizens. Relatively few Canadians (16 per cent) feel the federal government takes the matter very seriously, however, a clear majority (69 per cent) feel the government takes this responsibility somewhat seriously (up from 62 per cent in 2006). Only about one in ten (12 per cent – down from 20 per cent in 2006) feel the government does not take its responsibility to protect citizen information seriously.

  • Regionally, those from the Atlantic Provinces are more likely than other Canadians to believe that the government takes its responsibility very seriously (22 per cent).
  • Those 65 years and older are most likely to feel the government is not very serious about safeguarding Canadians’ personal information (16 per cent). Conversely only four per cent of Canadians under 25 feel that the government is not diligent in its responsibility to protect personal information.

Chart - Seriousness Governments Take in Protecting Personal Info (1)

2.9 Seriousness Businesses Take in Protecting Personal Information

Results are very similar when asked how seriously businesses take their responsibility to protect the personal information of consumers. Only 12 per cent of Canadians feel that businesses take this matter very seriously, however, a clear majority (66 per cent) feel that businesses take the privacy of consumer information somewhat seriously (up 15 percentage points since 2006). Results also reveal a significant decline in the number of respondents who say that businesses do not take their responsibility to protect customer information seriously (19 per cent – down from 34 per cent in 2006).

  • Regionally, respondents in Alberta express the highest confidence in businesses’ commitment to safeguarding the information of consumers (17 per cent).
  • Canadians under 25 years of age are more likely than their older counterparts to believe that businesses are very serious about keeping consumer information safe (20 per cent).

Chart - Seriousness Businesses Take in Protecting Personal Information (2)

2.10 Concern About Impact of Economic Uncertainty on Personal Information

Respondents were asked if they were concerned that in a time of economic uncertainty, businesses might choose to spend less on the protection of personal information about their customers. Results reveal that six in ten (61 per cent) say they are somewhat concerned about this possibility, and fully one-quarter (26 per cent) are very concerned that businesses will compromise protection of confidential information to save money. Only about one in ten Canadians (12 per cent) are not concerned about this issue.

  • Regionally, Ontarians are more likely to indicate they are very concerned about the possibility that businesses might be willing to sacrifice protection of personal information to cut costs (30 per cent), whereas residents in Quebec are less likely to feel this way (22 per cent).
  • Canadians aged 45 to 64 are somewhat more likely than others to be very concerned that businesses might spend less on protecting customers’ personal information (30 per cent, vs. 26 per cent nationally).

Chart - Concern About Impact of Economic Uncertainty on Personal Information

Top of PageTable of Contents3. New Technologies and Privacy Concerns

3.1 Knowledge of How New Technology Affects Privacy

Respondents were asked if they felt that they had enough information to understand how new technologies might affect their personal privacy. Results reveal that Canadians are less confident about this issue than they were a few years ago: while the plurality of Canadians (45 per cent) continue to feel that they do have enough information to know how their privacy could be affected by new technologies, this is down six percentage points since 2007. One-third of Canadians (33 per cent) feel that they do not have sufficient knowledge to assess the impact of new technologies on their privacy, and one in five (20 per cent) are neutral on the subject.

  • Men are more confident than women that they have enough information to understand how emerging technologies might affect their personal privacy (49 per cent, vs. 42 per cent, respectively).
  • Regionally, Quebec residents are more confident that they have enough information to determine how their privacy might be affected by new technologies (51 per cent).

Chart - Knowledge of How New Technology Affects Privacy

3.2 Concern About Impact of New Technology on Privacy

Canadians were also asked how concerned they were about the impact of new technologies on their privacy. Results reveal fairly high levels of concern with this issue: almost half of Canadians (48 per cent) say they are somewhat concerned, and another 42 per cent say they are very concerned. Only one in ten (nine per cent) say they are not concerned about the impact of new technologies on privacy.

  • Residents in Ontario express the highest levels of concern, with almost half (48 per cent) saying they are very concerned. In Quebec, only one-third (31 per cent) feel that new technologies represent a threat to their privacy.
  • Twice as many men as women say they are not concerned about new technologies affecting their privacy (11 per cent, vs. six per cent, respectively).
  • Those between the ages of 45 and 64 are particularly likely to say they are very concerned about the implications of emerging technologies on their personal privacy (48 per cent). Conversely, Canadians 25 and under are much less likely to express high levels of concern about this issue (33 per cent).

Chart - Concern About Impact of New Technology on Privacy

3.3 New Technologies and Privacy Concerns

Respondents were asked to identify, without prompting, any new technologies that are of particular concern to them with respect to privacy issues. The plurality of respondents (45 per cent) did not identify any technologies that were of particular concern to them. Among those who provided a response, one-quarter (26 per cent) mentioned the Internet or computer use as representing a possible threat to privacy, and another one in ten (10 per cent) say that hacking technologies (to invade privacy and facilitate identity theft) are worrisome in this regard. Security around credit card transactions and surveillance technologies were also mentioned by a number of respondents.

  • Concern over the implications of Internet/computer use on privacy is highest in Quebec (38 per cent) and lowest in Ontario (21 per cent).
  • Canadians between the ages of 45 and 64 are particularly worried about Internet/computer use (30 per cent), while those under 25 are much less worried about this issue (16 per cent).
  • University-educated respondents are twice as concerned about hacking technologies and identity theft as Canadians with a high school education or less (15 per cent, vs. seven per cent, respectively).

Chart - New Technologies and Privacy Concerns

3.4 Self-Rated Ability to Protect Personal Information

Respondents were asked to rate their ability to take appropriate precautions to protect their personal information and ensure that using the Internet is as safe as possible. Overall, Canadians show a fairly high degree of confidence in their abilities to protect themselves online, with over half (54 per cent) rating themselves as doing a good job, and only one in seven (15 per cent) feeling they do a poor job of safeguarding their personal information while online.

  • Six in ten Canadians between the ages of 25 and 44 (60 per cent) give themselves high marks for the precautions they take online, compared to just one in four (39 per cent) of those aged 65 and over.
  • Those with university education are more confident than those with a high school education or less that they take appropriate precautions to safeguard themselves online (62 per cent, vs. 43 per cent, respectively).

Chart - Self-Rated Ability to Protect Personal Information

3.5 Awareness of Radio Frequency Identification Tags

Respondents were asked about their awareness of radio frequency identification (RFID) tags, which allow any item that carries them to be tracked and monitored. Familiarity with this technology has remained largely stable over the past few years, with two-thirds of Canadians (64 per cent) saying they have never read or heard anything about RFID tags. Less than one-third (28 per cent) are certain they have heard of RFID technology, and seven per cent believe they may have heard of it.

  • A higher proportion of men than women say they have definitely heard about RFID tags (38 per cent, vs. 19 per cent, respectively).
  • Respondents in Ontario express higher levels of clear familiarity with RFID tags (33 per cent, compared to 28 per cent nationally); residents in Quebec are the least familiar, with four in five (80 per cent) saying they have never heard of this technology.

Chart - Awareness of Radio Frequency Identification Tags

3.6 Concern About RFID Tags and Privacy

Canadians were also asked how concerned they are about the impact that RFID technology might have on their privacy. A plurality of Canadians (44 per cent) say they are somewhat concerned, while four in ten (38 per cent) are very concerned. Only 15 per cent do not view RFID technology as a potential threat to their privacy.

  • Canadians between 45 and 64 years old are particularly likely to say they are very concerned about RFID tags (43 per cent).
  • A higher proportion of men than women say they have no concerns about the implications of RFID technology for privacy (19 per cent, vs. 12 per cent, respectively).

Chart - Concern About RFID Tags and Privacy

3.7 Awareness and Concern About Nanotechnology

Respondents were also asked about their awareness of nanotechnology, a field that involves the development of materials on an extremely small scale, which could in turn be used to make surveillance devices that are virtually undetectable. Close to half of the respondents surveyed (45 per cent) say they have definitely heard of nanotechnology, and another one in ten (11 per cent) cite some familiarity with it. About four in ten Canadians (43 per cent) say they have never read or heard about nanotechnology.

  • Claimed familiarity with nanotechnology is highest in the West (59 per cent in British Columbia and 58 per cent in Alberta say they have definitely heard of nanotechnology), and lowest in Quebec (where only 32 per cent say they have definitely heard of it).

When asked about the extent to which they were concerned that nanotechnology might impact their privacy, results reveal high levels of concern with this issue. More than eight in ten Canadians say they are very (41 per cent) or somewhat (42 per cent) concerned about the impact of nanotechnology on their privacy, and only one in seven (14 per cent) are not concerned.

  • Ontarians are most likely to say they are very concerned about the impact of nanotechnology on privacy (48 per cent), while Quebec residents are less likely to express high levels of concern (36 per cent).
  • A higher proportion of men express little concern about the implications of nanotechnology for privacy (17 per cent, compared to only 12 per cent of women).
  • Canadians between 45 and 64 years are more likely to be very concerned about nanotechnology (46 per cent); conversely, Canadians between 25 and 44 years old are less likely to be very concerned (35 per cent).

Chart - Awareness and Concern About Nanotechnology

3.8 Genetic Testing and Privacy Issues

Respondents were also asked if they thought that genetic testing raised any privacy issues. Canadians are divided on this question, with half (51 per cent) believing that such testing does raise issues around privacy, and over four in ten (45 per cent) saying that it does not.

  • Residents of Ontario are more concerned than other Canadians about genetic testing and privacy (56 per cent), while respondents in Quebec are less concerned (40 per cent).
  • Women are more concerned than men about the impact of genetic testing on personal privacy (54 per cent, vs. 48 per cent, respectively).
  • University-educated Canadians express greater concern about genetic testing (58 per cent) than do those with a high school education or less (46 per cent).

Chart - Genetic Testing and Privacy Issues

3.9 Genetic Testing and Privacy Concerns

Those respondents who indicated they were concerned about genetic testing and privacy issues were asked, unprompted, to name any privacy issues related to genetic testing that is of particular concern to them. The plurality of these respondents (31 per cent) could not specify any particular issue of concern. Among those able to provide a response, one in five (18 per cent) mention concerns about confidentiality and privacy of information, and a further 12 per cent worry that results of genetic testing might be used for unintended purposes. Just over one in ten (11 per cent) worry that such information might affect insurance coverage.

  • Canadians with a university level education are more concerned than others about the potential implications for insurance coverage (18 per cent) and the possibility that test results might be used in unintended ways (17 per cent).

Chart - Genetic Testing and Privacy Concerns

3.10 Support for Use of Genetic Testing

Respondents were asked whether they support or oppose the use of genetic testing results by health insurance companies to determine who is insurable and at what premiums. Results reveal that over two-thirds of Canadians (68 per cent) oppose the use of genetic testing for such purposes, and only one in ten (10 per cent) support it.

  • Fully three-quarters of university-educated respondents (75 per cent) oppose health insurance companies using genetic test results to determine insurability
  • Men are slightly more predisposed to support genetic testing for health insurance purposes than women (12 per cent, vs. nine per cent, respectively).

Even stronger disagreement is expressed when asked whether employers should be able to use genetic tests to make hiring and promotion decisions: more than eight in ten Canadians (83 per cent) oppose such practices, while only one in ten (11 per cent) are in favour.

  • Quebec residents are somewhat less likely to oppose an employer’s use of genetic testing results for hiring and promotion decisions (78 per cent).
  • Canadians between the ages of 25 and 64 are particularly likely to oppose the use of genetic testing by employers (87 per cent).

Chart - Support for Use of Genetic Testing

Top of PageTable of Contents4. Privacy and Security

4.1 Balance Between Privacy and Security

Survey results suggest that Canadians feel personal privacy is an important consideration as governments provide law enforcement and intelligence agencies with enhanced powers. Nine in ten feel it is very (45 per cent) or somewhat (45 per cent) important that privacy considerations factor into decisions about enhanced security powers for law enforcement agencies, and fewer than one in ten (seven per cent) view this issue as having little importance.

  • Canadians between 45 and 64 years are particularly likely to view consideration of personal privacy in the context of enhanced powers for law enforcement as very important (51 per cent).
  • Conversely, Canadians under 25 are more likely than others to view the consideration of personal privacy as a matter of little importance (12 per cent).

Chart - Balance Between Privacy and Security

4.2 Confidence in New Security Measures

Canadians were also asked how confident they are that new security measures at borders and airports result in increased safety and security. Only one in five (20 per cent) say they are very confident that new security measures result in increased safety and security, however, a clear majority (62 per cent) say they are moderately confident. Only one in six (17 per cent) express no confidence in the impact of new security measures to increase the safety and security of Canadians.

  • Residents in British Columbia are less likely to be very confident of the effectiveness of new security measures (11 per cent), while Quebec residents (24 per cent) are most likely to be very confident.
  • Respondents with high school education or less are particularly likely to say they are very confident in the ability of new security measures to increase safety (26 per cent), while those with university education are less likely to feel this way (13 per cent ).

Chart - Confidence in New Security Measures

4.3 Confidence that Law Enforcement Agencies Will Adhere to Privacy Laws

Respondents were asked how confident they are that Canadian law enforcement and security agencies adhere to privacy laws that restrict the collection, storage, and sharing of personal information. Results reveal some scepticism among Canadians in this area: only about one in seven (15 per cent) are very confident that Canadian authorities respect the laws that protect Canadians’ privacy, however, most (66 per cent) are moderately confident that this is the case. Only one in six (17 per cent) have little confidence that privacy rules are being followed by law enforcement agencies.

  • British Columbia residents are more sceptical about Canadian law enforcement’s commitment to adhering to privacy laws, with over one in four (26 per cent) saying they are not confident that privacy laws are being followed.
  • Those 65 years of age and older are more likely than their younger counterparts to express little confidence that security agencies are adhering to the laws set out to protect Canadians’ privacy (23 per cent, vs. 17 per cent nationally).

Chart - Confidence that Law Enforcement Agencies Will Adhere to Privacy Laws

Top of PageTable of Contents5. Identity Integrity and Protection

5.1 Experience and Concern with Identity Theft

Turning to another topic, respondents were asked if they had ever been a victim of identity theft. Results suggest that the vast majority of Canadians (83 per cent) have not experienced identity theft, although over one in six Canadians (16 per cent) say they have.

  • Those earning $100,000 or more are particularly likely to say they have been victims of identity theft, with one in five (21 per cent) saying they have been a victim of this crime.

Interestingly, despite fairly limited first hand experience with this issue, almost half of Canadians (49 per cent) say that they are very concerned about identity theft, and 44 per cent are somewhat concerned; only six per cent of Canadians say they are not concerned about this issue.

  • Canadians 45 to 64 years of age are more likely than others to be very concerned about identity theft (58 per cent).
  • Regionally, concern about identity theft is highest in Ontario (58 per cent) and lowest in Quebec (33 per cent).

Chart - Experience and Concern with Identity Theft

5.2 Actions Taken to Protect Personal Information

Respondents were also asked whether they had ever taken specific actions to protect their personal information, such as requesting to see personal information about themselves maintained by the government or a business, ordering a copy of their credit report, or declining to provide personal information to a business. Half (51 per cent) of respondents say they have refused to share personal information with a business, however, fewer than one in five say they have verified their credit report for accuracy (18 per cent), and an even smaller number have asked to see personal information about them kept by a business (13 per cent) or the government (10 per cent).

  • Interestingly, Canadians under 25 years of age are twice as likely as the national average to indicate that they have requested to see information about themselves kept by the government (19 per cent).
  • British Columbia residents are particularly likely to say they have declined to share personal information with a business (61 per cent). Conversely, only four in ten Quebeckers (40 per cent) say they have refused to provide personal information to a business.
  • One in four Canadians between 25 and 44 years (25 per cent) say they have verified their own credit report, compared to only one in ten (10 per cent) Canadians 65 and over.

Chart - Actions Taken to Protect Personal Information

5.3 Comfort with Sharing Personal Information

When asked how comfortable they are sharing personal information in a variety of contexts (i.e., online transactions, social networking sites, telemarketing solicitations, and customer loyalty programs), results suggest that Canadians’ comfort with sharing personal information varies depending on the situation. The vast majority of Canadians (84 per cent) are not comfortable providing personal information to a telemarketer, and six in ten (61 per cent) are uncomfortable sharing private information on social networking sites. However, only one-third (35 per cent) are uncomfortable providing personal information in transactions over the Internet, and just one in four (27 per cent) are uncomfortable with providing this type of information to a business or organization as part of a customer loyalty program.

  • As education and income levels increase, so too do comfort levels with providing personal information in the context of online transactions and customer loyalty programs. However, those with higher incomes and education levels are also less comfortable sharing personal information with telemarketers or social networking sites.
  • Canadians 65 years and older are more uncomfortable than other respondents in sharing personal information through customer loyalty programs (35 per cent), and online transactions (43 per cent).

Chart - Comfort with Sharing Personal Information

5.4 Actions Taken to Protect Passwords

Survey results also suggest that Canadians take action to protect their passwords. Two-thirds (65 per cent) say they use passwords that contain random letters and numerals, almost six in ten (58 per cent) check their browser to ensure they are using a secure site, and half (49 per cent) make a point of using different passwords for multiple accounts. About one in three (30 per cent) also say they password-protect information held on portable digital devices.

  • Those with higher education and income levels are particularly likely to use passwords that are difficult to guess.
  • Men are more likely to password-protect information on their portable digital devices than are women (33 per cent, vs. 26 per cent, respectively).

Chart - Actions Taken to Protect Passwords

5.5 Preferred Action in Event of Breach of Personal Information

Respondents were asked what actions they thought a company should be required to take in the event of a security breach that compromised customers’ personal information. Three in four (75 per cent) say that companies should be required to notify both the individuals affected and the government agencies who oversee Canada’s privacy laws. One in seven (14 per cent) feel that only the individuals affected need be notified, and six per cent say that the company in question should only be required to notify the relevant government agencies. Virtually no one feels that in the event of an information breach involving their personal information there is no need to notify either individuals or government agencies.

  • Those with college and university-level education are more apt to want notification of both individuals and government agencies in the event of a security breach (79 per cent and 83 per cent, respectively), while Canadians with high school education or less lean more towards notification of individuals only (21 per cent).

Chart - Preferred Action in Event of Breach of Personal Information

5.6 Experience with Breach of Personal Information

Canadians were also asked if they had ever experienced a serious incident in which their personal information was used inappropriately, or released to a third party without their consent. While a small minority of Canadians (16 per cent) say they have been victims of unauthorized use of their personal information, a clear majority (82 per cent) say they have not experienced this situation.

  • Residents of British Columbia report a higher incidence of violations of their personal information (23 per cent), while those in Quebec report a lower incidence of inappropriate release of their personal information (10 per cent).
  • Canadians with high school education or less are less likely than others to say they have experienced unauthorized use of their personal information (11 per cent).

Chart - Experience with Breach of Personal Information

5.7 Actions to Protect Personal Information

When asked about the precautions they take to protect their personal information, results suggest that Canadians are extremely careful about their personal information. An overwhelming majority of Canadians (92 per cent) say they make a point of reviewing their credit card and bank statements to ensure there are no unauthorized purchases, and 71 per cent say they keep track of when their statements should arrive each month. A further 85 per cent of Canadians say they shred or destroy documents that contain personal information. In addition, almost half of all Canadians (48 per cent) say they refrain from carrying sensitive documents (e.g., SIN card, passport) with them on a daily basis.

  • In general, women are more cautious than men when it comes to protecting their personal information: women are more likely than men to keep track of credit card and banking statements (75 per cent, vs. 67 per cent, respectively), and are also more likely than men to destroy documents containing their personal information (87 per cent, vs. 83 per cent, respectively).
  • Canadians 65 years of age and older tend to be more vigilant about protecting their personal information than their younger counterparts. Seventy-eight per cent say they keep track of credit card and banking statements and fully 96 per cent scrutinize their statements for unauthorized purchases. Interestingly, however, these older Canadians also have a greater tendency to carry sensitive documents with them on a regular basis (61 per cent).

Chart - Actions to Protect Personal Information

5.8 Concern About Businesses Transferring Personal Information Outside Canada

Respondents were also asked if they were concerned about businesses or organizations transferring their personal information for processing or storage outside of Canada. Results reveal that two-thirds of respondents (66 per cent) express concern about their personal information being stored outside of Canada, while one-third (30 per cent) are not bothered by it.

  • Regionally, residents of Ontario are more concerned about their personal information being processed abroad (71 per cent), while those living in Quebec are less concerned (49 per cent).
  • Canadians under 25 are less concerned about off-shore processing and storage of their personal information (49 per cent), while those aged 45 to 64 express higher levels of concern over this practice (72 per cent).
  • Men are more concerned than women about their information being stored outside of Canada (71 per cent, vs. 62 per cent, respectively).

Chart - Concern About Businesses Transferring Personal Information Outside Canada

5.9 Actions to Preserve Privacy

Respondents were asked if they had ever actively sought information about their privacy rights (e.g., by contacting an organization, visiting a Web site, or reviewing a publication for guidance). Results reveal that only one in five Canadians (19 per cent) say they have sought out such information, while four in five (80 per cent) say they have not.

  • Those 65 years of age and older are less likely than others to have sought out information about their privacy rights (nine per cent, vs. 19 per cent nationally).
  • Those with a university education are more likely to have inquired about their privacy rights (27 per cent), while those with high school education or less are less likely to have done this (13 per cent).

Canadians were further asked if they had ever reviewed an organization’s privacy policy. Results suggest a more proactive stance on the part of Canadians on this issue: half of respondents (49 per cent) say they have reviewed an organization’s privacy policy, and half (49 per cent) say they have not.

  • Regionally, residents in Alberta show the strongest inclination to familiarize themselves with an organizational policy on privacy, with 65 per cent saying they have reviewed an organization’s policy. In contrast, only one in four respondents in Quebec (24 per cent) say they have checked an organization’s policy about the privacy of information.
  • Those with higher education levels and higher incomes are more likely to report having looked into an organization’s privacy policy.

Chart - Actions to Preserve Privacy

5.10 Agreement that Political Parties Should be Subject to Privacy Legislation

Finally, respondents were asked their opinion as to whether political parties and politicians should be subject to legislation that sets out rules for how they collect and handle the personal information of Canadian citizens. An overwhelming majority of Canadians (92 per cent) feel that political parties and politicians should be subject to such legislation, while a scant six per cent think they should not.

  • As with many other issues, Quebec residents prove to be a regional exception, with only eight in ten (83 per cent) believing that political parties and politicians should be subject to rules that regulate the collection and handling of personal information. Conversely, respondents in British Columbia (97 per cent) and Alberta (99 per cent) almost universally feel that politicians should be subject to such laws.

Chart - Agreement that Political Parties Should be Subject to Privacy Legislation

Top of PageTable of ContentsAppendix A: Survey Questionnaire
(English and French)

INTRO [0,0]

Hello, my name is ... and I'm calling from EKOS Research Associates. We are conducting a short survey on behalf of the Government of Canada on a number of issues currently in the news. It is totally voluntary and all responses will be kept strictly confidential. We are talking to people 16 years and over who are permanent residents of Canada. May I begin?

SEX

Gender of respondent

DO NOT ASK

  1. Male (1)
  2. Female (2)

QAWAR3

If... 1.EQ.1

OPCC TRACKING

Are you aware of any federal institutions that help Canadians deal with privacy and the protection of personal information from inappropriate collection, use and disclosure?

  1. Yes, clearly (1)
  2. Yes, vaguely (2)
  3. No (3)
  4. DK/NR (9)

QAWAR4 [1,5]

If... QAWAR3.EQ.1,2

OPCC TRACKING

Which FEDERAL INSTITUTIONS are you aware of?

DO NOT READ - DO NOT PROMPT

  1. OFFICE OF THE PRIVACY COMMISSIONER OF CANADA (1) I
  2. RECALL AGENCY, BUT CANNOT SPECIFY NAME (2) I
  3. JUSTICE AGENCIES,EX.JUSTICE DEPARTMENT,COURTS (3) I
  4. LAW ENFORCEMENT/SECURITY AGENCIES, EX. RCMP/POLICE/CSIS (4) I
  5. CANADA REVENUE AGENCY (5) I
  6. CONSUMER PROTECTION AGENCIES,CONSUMER AFFAIRS (6) I
  7. GOV/T OMBUDSMAN (7) I
  8. HRDC (8) I
  9. BANKS(GENERAL) (9) I
  10. HUMAN RIGHTS COMMISSION (10) I
  11. OTHER (97) I
  12. Response -> AQAWAR4; C250 L2 C75 (77)
  13. DK/NR (99) X
  14. STATISTICS CANADA (11) I
  15. AGENCIES RELATED TO HEALTH OF CANADIANS,EX.HEALTH CANADA,PROVINCIAL HEALTH MINISTRIES (12) I
  16. ACCESS TO INFORMATION & PRIVACY ACT/PRIVACY ACT/FREEDOM OF INFORMATION (MENTIONS OF "ACTS") (13) I
  17. CRTC (CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION) 14 I

KNOW6

If... 1.EQ.1

OPCC TRACKING

How would you rate your knowledge of your privacy rights under the various laws protecting your personal information? Would you say very poor, poor, neither good nor bad, good or very good?

  1. Very poor (1)
  2. Poor (2)
  3. Neither good nor bad (3)
  4. Good (4)
  5. Very good (5)
  6. DK/NR 9

IMPR6

If... 1.EQ.1

OPCC TRACKING

In your day to day life, how good of a job would you say you are doing to protect the privacy of your own personal information. Would you say very poor, poor, neither good nor bad, good or very good?

  1. Very poor (1)
  2. Poor (2)
  3. Neither good nor bad (3)
  4. Good (4)
  5. Very good (5)
  6. DK/NR 9

QAGR1 [0,0]

Please rate the degree to which you agree or disagree with the following statements using a 7 point scale where 1 means you strongly disagree, 7 means you strongly agree and the mid-point 4 means you neither agree nor disagree.

DIA6B

If... 1.EQ.1

OPCC TRACKING

I feel I have less protection of my personal information in my daily life than I did ten years ago.

  1. Strongly disagree 1 (1)
  2. 2 (2)
  3. 3 (3)
  4. Neither agree nor disagree 4 (4)
  5. 5 (5)
  6. 6 (6)
  7. Strongly agree 7 (7)
  8. DK/NR 9

PDI6B

If... 1.EQ.1

OPCC TRACKING

Protecting the personal information of Canadians will be one of the most important issues facing our country in the next ten years.

  1. Strongly disagree 1 (1)
  2. 2 (2)
  3. 3 (3)
  4. Neither agree nor disagree 4 (4)
  5. 5 (5)
  6. 6 (6)
  7. Strongly agree 7 (7)
  8. DK/NR 9

TQ2

I am confident that businesses and organizations have adequate security safeguards to protect my personal information.

  1. 1. Strongly disagree (1)
  2. 2 (2)
  3. 3 (3)
  4. 4. Neither agree nor disagree (4)
  5. 5 (5)
  6. 6 (6)
  7. 7. Strongly agree (7)
  8. DK/NR 9

ENO6

If... 1.EQ.1

OPCC TRACKING

I feel confident that I have enough information to know how new technologies might affect my personal privacy.

  1. 1. Strongly disagree (1)
  2. 2 (2)
  3. 3 (3)
  4. 4. Neither agree nor disagree (4)
  5. 5 (5)
  6. 6 (6)
  7. 7. Strongly agree (7)
  8. DK/NR (9)

CLPR

I am concerned that our current focus on security following the 9/11 terrorist attacks will unnecessarily restrict the privacy and civil liberties of Canadians.

  1. 1 Strongly disagree (1)
  2. 2 (2)
  3. 3 (3)
  4. 4 Neither agree nor disagree (4)
  5. 5 (5)
  6. 6 (6)
  7. 7 Strongly agree (7)
  8. DK/NR (9)

ILAW2

If... 1.EQ.1

OPCC TRACKING

How important is it to you personally to have strong laws to protect Canadians' personal information? Please use a scale from 1 to 7, where 1 is not at all important, 7 is extremely important and 4 is somewhat important.

  1. 1. Not at all important (1)
  2. 2 (2)
  3. 3 (3)
  4. 4. Somewhat important (4)
  5. 5 (5)
  6. 6 (6)
  7. 7. Extremely important (7)
  8. DK/NR (9)

SYFG6

If... 1.EQ.1

OPCC TRACKING

In your opinion, how seriously does the federal government take its responsibility to protect citizen personal information? Please use a scale from 1 to 7, where 1 is not at all seriously, 7 is extremely seriously and 4 is somewhat seriously.

  1. 1. Not at all seriously (1)
  2. 2 (2)
  3. 3 (3)
  4. 4. Somewhat seriously (4)
  5. 5 (5)
  6. 6 (6)
  7. 7. Extremely seriously (7)
  8. DK/NR (9)

SYRB6

If... 1.EQ.1

OPCC TRACKING

And on the same scale, how seriously do businesses take their responsibility to protect consumer personal information?

  1. 1. Not at all seriously (1)
  2. 2 (2)
  3. 3 (3)
  4. 4. Somewhat seriously (4)
  5. 5 (5)
  6. 6 (6)
  7. 7. Extremely seriously (7)
  8. DK/NR (9)

NQ3

How concerned are you that in a time of economic uncertainty, businesses may choose to spend less to protect customers’ personal information? Please use a 7 point scale where 1 means not at all concerned, 7 means extremely concerned, and the mid-point 4 means somewhat concerned.

  1. 1. Not at all concerned (1)
  2. 2 (2)
  3. 3 (3)
  4. 4. Somewhat concerned (4)
  5. 5 (5)
  6. 6 (6)
  7. 7. Extremely concerned (7)
  8. DK/NR (9)

NQ1

How concerned are you about the impact of new technologies on your privacy? Please use a 7 point scale where 1 means not at all concerned, 7 means extremely concerned and the mid-point 4 means somewhat concerned.

  1. 1. Not at all concerned (1)
  2. 2 (2)
  3. 3 (3)
  4. 4. Somewhat concerned (4)
  5. 5 (5)
  6. 6 (6)
  7. 7. Extremely concerned (7)
  8. DK/NR (9)

NQ2

Are there any new technologies that you are particularly concerned about with respect to privacy issues? If so, which ones?

  1. Response -> ANQ2; C250 L2 C75 (77)
  2. DK/NR (9)
  3. HACKING TECHNOLOGIES/INVASION OF PRIVACY/IDENTITY THEFT (UNPROTECTED DATABASES, HACKING INTO COMPANY/GOVERNMENT INFO, TRANSACTION INFO, INFO NOT BEING PROTECTED BY COMPANIES/GOVERNMENT...) (1) I
  4. INTERNET/COMPUTER USE (GENERAL MENTION; INCLUDES MENTIONS OF 'ELECTRONIC' AND "WIRELESS TECHNOLOGIES") (2) I
  5. ON LINE SOCIAL NETWORKING SITES/MUSIC, VIDEO, CHAT (FACEBOOK, YOU TUBE, CHAT ROOMS, GAMING SITES...) (3) I
  6. BANKING/ON LINE BANKING (4) I
  7. USE OF CELL PHONE/TELECOMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY/HANDHELD DEVICES; PDA'S, BLACKBERRIES, MOBILE DEVICES) (5) I
  8. CREDIT CARDS/DEBIT CARD CONCERNS OF TRANSACTIONS/USE (CARDS IN GENERAL) (6) I
  9. COMPANIES/ORGS SELLING INFORMATION/SHARING INFORMATION/MISUSE OF INFORMATION (INCLUDES DATA MINING, TELEMARKETING, SOLICITING, INCLUDES DO NOT CALL LISTS BEING MISUSED) (7) I
  10. SURVEILLANCE/TRACKING/RECORDING TECHNOLOGIES (CARD/LICENCE CHIP TECHNOLOGY, SATELITE, GPS, CAMERAS, PHONE TAPPING, RF-ID'S, SMART CARDS...) (8) I
  11. OTHER (97) I

TQ1

How would you rate your ability to take the appropriate precautions to protect your personal information and ensure that using the Internet is as safe and secure as possible? Please use a 7 point scale where 1 means very poor, 7 means very good and the mid-point 4 neither good nor bad.

  1. 1. Very poor (1)
  2. 2 (2)
  3. 3 (3)
  4. 4. Neither good nor bad (4)
  5. 5 (5)
  6. 6 (6)
  7. 7. Very good (7)
  8. DK/NR (9)

RFID6

If... 1.EQ.1

OPCC TRACKING

Radio frequency identification or RFID tags use wireless technology and are designed to allow things to be tracked and monitored. When installed in products, they allow companies to keep track of products in warehouses and retail stores. These tags may still be active after the items have been purchased and taken out of a retail store. Before this survey, have you ever read or heard about radio frequency identification tags?

  1. Yes, definitely (1)
  2. Yes, maybe (2)
  3. No (3)
  4. DK/NR (9)

RFIDB

To what extent are you concerned about the impact this new technology might have on your privacy? Please use a 7 point scale where 1 means not at all concerned, 7 means extremely concerned and the mid-point 4 means somewhat concerned.

  1. 1. Not at all concerned (1)
  2. 2 (2)
  3. 3 (3)
  4. 4. Somewhat concerned (4)
  5. 5 (5)
  6. 6 (6)
  7. 7. Extremely concerned (7)
  8. DK/NR (9)

NANO

Nanotechnology involves developing materials or devices on an ultra small scale. In the near future, this technology will make it possible to make surveillance devices that are smaller than a grain of sand. Before this survey, have you ever read or heard about nanotechnology?

  1. Yes, definitely (1)
  2. Yes, maybe (2)
  3. No (3)
  4. DK/NR (9)

NANOB

To what extent are you concerned about the impact this new technology might have on your privacy? Please use a 7 point scale where 1 means not at all concerned, 7 means extremely concerned and the mid-point 4 means somewhat concerned.

  1. 1. Not at all concerned (1)
  2. 2 (2)
  3. 3 (3)
  4. 4. Somewhat concerned (4)
  5. 5 (5)
  6. 6 (6)
  7. 7. Extremely concerned (7)
  8. DK/NR (9)

PGEN [0,0]

Genetic testing examines a person's DNA to determine if that person has or will develop a certain disease or could pass a disease to his or her offspring.

GTEST

Do you think genetic testing raises any privacy issues?

  1. Yes (1)
  2. No (2)
  3. DK/NR (9)

GTEST1F

If... GTEST.EQ.1

What privacy issues related to genetic testing are of particular concern to you?

  1. Response -> AGTEST1F; C250 L2 C75 (77)
  2. DK/NR (99)
  3. INSURANCE COVERAGE/INSURANCE CONCERNS (DIFFICULT GETTING COVERAGE, RESULTS MAY BE USED AS A FORM OF DISCRIMINATION TOWARDS COVERAGE/BENEFICIARY OF COVERAGE, DENIED COVERAGE/FURTHER COVERAGE) (1) I
  4. EMPLOYER/EMPLOYMENT CONCERNS (RESULTS COULD BE USED ACCESSED AND USED AGAINST YOU, COULD BE DENIED FURTHER/FUTURE EMPLOYMENT, USED TO DETERMINE ABILITIES OR POSITION IN THE COMPANY) (2) I
  5. GENETIC TESTING RESULTS COULD BE USED NEGATIVELY/MISUSED/ABUSEDINAPPROPRIATE DECISIONS MADE (GENERAL: COULD BE DISCRIMINATED AGAINST BY SOCIETY, PEOPLE, BUSINESSES, GOVERNMENT, POLICE, VARIOUS AGENCIES) (3) I
  6. CONCERNS WITH CONFIDENTIALITY/PRIVACY/PROTECTION/ACCESS/SHARING OF HEALTH INFORMATION (HOW IT IS DISTRIBUTED, SECURITY ISSUES, COULD BE LEAKED OUT, HACKED INTO, FALSIFIED, TAMPERED WITH) (4) I
  7. CONCERNS WITH ACCESS TO MEDICAL/HEALTH CARE SERVICES (COULD BE SCREENED OUT, DISCRIMINATED AGAINST, HEALTH CARE COST COULD RISE, FACT THAT IT IS ONLY AVAILABLE THROUGH PRIVATE/PAYMENT ACCESS, NO ACCESS TO TESTING, HEALTH CARE RESOURCES NOT SHARED EQUALLY, COULD BE ENCOURAGED TO TERMINATE PREGNANCY) (5) I
  8. CONCERNS WITH TENDENCIES TOWARDS EUGENICS/GENETIC ENGINEERING/SELECTION/"DESIGNER BABIES" AND "CLONING" (FEAR OF PRENATAL/PARENTAL/MARITAL DECISIONS BEING AFFECTED, ISSUES WITH ABORTION RATES RISING, NATURAL SELECTION AND RANDOMNESS OF BIRTH) (6) I
  9. LEGALITIES/LEGISLATION/REGULATION/MONITORING/DEFINING ETHICAL STANDARDS/AGENDA (CONSENT OF THE INDIVIDUAL,QUESTIONS OF STATE AND INDIVIDUAL CONTROL OF INFORMATION, GENETIC PROFILING, MORAL ISSUES OF WHEN IT HAS GONE TOO FAR, DEFINING NEW GROUND, QUESTIONS OF THE EFFECTS IT WILL HAVE ON THE FUTUR, ETHICS) (7) I
  10. OTHER (97) I

GTEST2

Would you say you generally support or oppose the use of genetic testing by health insurance companies to determine who to insure or how much to charge? Please use a 7 point scale where 1 means strongly oppose, 7 means strongly support and the mid-point 4 means neither support nor oppose.

  1. 1. Strongly oppose (1)
  2. 2 (2)
  3. 3 (3)
  4. 4. Neither support nor oppose (4)
  5. 5 (5)
  6. 6 (6)
  7. 7. Strongly support (7)
  8. DK/NR (9)

GTEST3

Would you say you generally support or oppose employers using a person’s genetic test results to make decisions about hiring and promotion? Please use a 7 point scale where 1 means strongly oppose, 7 means strongly support and the mid-point 4 means neither support nor oppose.

  1. 1. Strongly oppose (1)
  2. 2 (2)
  3. 3 (3)
  4. 4. Neither support nor oppose (4)
  5. 5 (5)
  6. 6 (6)
  7. 7. Strongly support (7)
  8. DK/NR (9)

NSP1

How important should a person’s privacy be considered as governments provide law enforcement and intelligence agencies with enhanced powers? Please use a scale from 1 to 7, where 1 is not at all important, 7 is extremely important and 4 is somewhat important.

  1. 1. Not at all important (1)
  2. 2 (2)
  3. 3 (3)
  4. 4. Somewhat important (4)
  5. 5 (5)
  6. 6 (6)
  7. 7. Extremely important (7)
  8. DK/NR (9)

NSP2

How confident are you that new security measures (at borders and airports, for example) result in increased safety and security? Please respond on a 7-point scale where 1 means not at all confident, 7 means extremely confident and the mid-point 4 means moderately confident.

  1. 1 Not at all confident (1)
  2. 2 (2)
  3. 3 (3)
  4. 4 Moderately confident (4)
  5. 5 (5)
  6. 6 (6)
  7. 7 Completely confident (7)
  8. DK/NR (9) X

RPIN

As you may be aware, law enforcement and security agencies in Canada are subject to privacy laws that place restrictions on the collection, storage and sharing of personal information. How confident are you that law enforcement and security agencies in Canada adhere to these privacy laws? Please respond on a 7-point scale where 1 means not at all confident, 7 means extremely confident and the mid-point 4 means moderately confident.

  1. 1 Not at all confident (1)
  2. 2 (2)
  3. 3 (3)
  4. 4 Moderately confident (4)
  5. 5 (5)
  6. 6 (6)
  7. 7 Completely confident (7)
  8. DK/NR (9) X

IM1

Have you ever been a victim of IDENTITY THEFT? By identity theft, we mean the unauthorized collection and use of your personal information, usually for criminal purposes (e.g., cashing cheques in your name, withdrawing funds from your bank account, unauthorized use of your credit card?).

  1. Yes (1)
  2. No (2)
  3. DK/NR (9)

IM2

How concerned are you personally about the issue of identity theft? Please use a 7 point scale where 1 means not at all concerned, 7 means extremely concerned and the mid-point 4 means somewhat concerned.

  1. 1. Not at all concerned (1)
  2. 2 (2)
  3. 3 (3)
  4. 4. Somewhat concerned (4)
  5. 5 (5)
  6. 6 (6)
  7. 7. Extremely concerned (7)
  8. DK/NR (9)

PIM3BAT [0,0]

Have you done any of the following in the past year?

READ LIST

IM3BAT1

Requested to see personal information about yourself that is kept by government.

  1. Yes (1)
  2. No (2)
  3. DK/NR (9)

IM3BAT2

Requested to see personal information about yourself that is kept by a business.

  1. Yes (1)
  2. No (2)
  3. DK/NR (9)

IM3BAT3

Ordered a copy of your credit report to verify its accuracy.

  1. Yes (1)
  2. No (2)
  3. DK/NR (9)

IM3BAT4

Declined to share your personal information with a business?

  1. Yes (1)
  2. No (2)
  3. DK/NR (9)

PIM4BAT [0,0]

How comfortable are you with sharing personal information such as your name, address, telephone number, email address, date of birth, or financial information for each of the following. Please use a scale from 1 to 7, where 1 is not at all comfortable, 7 is extremely comfortable and 4 is neither comfortable nor uncomfortable

READ LIST

IM4BAT1

Online transactions (such as online banking, purchasing products or services over the Internet, etc)?

  1. Not at all comfortable 1 (1)
  2. 2 (2)
  3. 3 (3)
  4. Neither comfortable nor uncomfortable 4 (4)
  5. 5 (5)
  6. 6 (6)
  7. Extremely comfortable 7 (7)
  8. DK/NR (9)

IM4BAT2

Loyalty programs, such as Air Miles, reward programs at gas stations, or credit cards which allow you to collect points?

  1. Not at all comfortable 1 (1)
  2. 2 (2)
  3. 3 (3)
  4. Neither comfortable nor uncomfortable 4 (4)
  5. 5 (5)
  6. 6 (6)
  7. Extremely comfortable 7 (7)
  8. DK/NR (9)

IM4BAT3

Social networking sites such as Facebook and MySpace?

  1. Not at all comfortable 1 (1)
  2. 2 (2)
  3. 3 (3)
  4. Neither comfortable nor uncomfortable 4 (4)
  5. 5 (5)
  6. 6 (6)
  7. Extremely comfortable 7 (7)
  8. DK/NR (9)

IM4BAT4

Telemarketers?

  1. Not at all comfortable 1 (1)
  2. 2 (2)
  3. 3 (3)
  4. Neither comfortable nor uncomfortable 4 (4)
  5. 5 (5)
  6. 6 (6)
  7. Extremely comfortable 7 (7)
  8. DK/NR (9)

PIM5BAT [0,0]

When you use your computer or create online accounts, do you:

IM5BAT1

Use passwords that contain random numerals and letters and are difficult to guess?

  1. Yes (1)
  2. No (2)
  3. Not applicable (8)
  4. DK/NR (9)

IM5BAT2

Use the same password for multiple accounts?

  1. Yes (1)
  2. No (2)
  3. Not applicable (8)
  4. DK/NR (9)

IM5BAT3

Look for the padlock symbol at the top or bottom of your browser, which indicates you are using a secure site?

  1. Yes (1)
  2. No (2)
  3. Not applicable (8)
  4. DK/NR (9)

QIM10

Do you use passwords to protect information on your portable digital devices, such as your Blackberry or cell phone?

  1. Yes (1)
  2. No (2)
  3. Not applicable (8)
  4. DK/NR (9)

NOTF1

Sometimes, personal information that is held by a company about their customers might be compromised, either due to criminal activity or due to a flaw in the company's security system. If a company were to experience a breach involving your personal information, which of the following best describes your views? Would you say that companies should be required to ...

READ LIST

  1. notify individuals who are affected (1)
  2. notify government agencies who oversee Canada's privacy laws (2)
  3. notify both individuals and government agencies (3)
  4. There is no need to notify either individuals or government agencies 4 B
  5. (DO NOT READ) DK/NR 9 B

PI71

Have you ever experienced a serious incident where your personal information was used inappropriately or released without your consent (such as credit card information)?

  1. Yes (1)
  2. No (2)
  3. DK/NR (9)

QIM1

Do you carry sensitive documents with you daily, such as your SIN card, passport or birth certificate in your wallet or purse?

  1. Yes (1)
  2. No (2)
  3. DK/NR (9)

QIM2

Do you keep track of when your credit card and banking statements should arrive each month and inquire if they do not arrive on time?

  1. Yes (1)
  2. No (2)
  3. DK/NR (9)

QIM3

Do you review all credit card and bank statements to make sure there are no unauthorized purchases?

  1. Yes (1)
  2. No (2)
  3. DK/NR (9)

QIM4

Do you shred or destroy documents containing personal information, such as credit card offers, insurance and loan applications, bills and credit card receipts?

  1. Yes (1)
  2. No (2)
  3. DK/NR (9)

QIM5

Are you concerned about businesses or organizations transferring your personal information for processing or storage outside of Canada?

  1. Yes (1)
  2. No (2)
  3. DK/NR (9)

QIM6

Have you ever actively sought out information about your privacy rights, for example by contacting an organization, visiting a Web site, or reviewing a publication for guidance?

  1. Yes (1)
  2. No (2)
  3. DK/NR (9)

QIM7

Have you ever reviewed an organization’s privacy policy?

  1. Yes (1)
  2. No (2)
  3. DK/NR (9)

QIM8

Do you believe that political parties and politicians should be subject to legislation setting out rules for how they collect and handle your personal information?

  1. Yes (1)
  2. No (2)
  3. DK/NR (9)

DEMIN [0,0]

These final questions are used for statistical purposes only.

HOU

Which of the following types best describes your current household? ** IF THEY SAY THEY ARE LIVING WITH THEIR PARENT(S) THEN THE HOUSEHOLD IS EITHER 02 (ONE ADULT WITH CHILD/CHILDREN) OR 04 (MARRIED OR COMMON-LAW COUPLE, WITH CHILDREN)

  1. One person, living alone (1)
  2. One adult with child/children (2)
  3. A married or common-law couple, without children (3)
  4. A married or common-law couple, with children (4)
  5. Two or more unrelated persons (5)
  6. Living with relatives other than parents (6)
  7. More than one adult with child/children (7)
  8. OTHER -> AHOU; C200 L2 C75 (77)
  9. DK/NR (99)
  10. MARRIED OR COMMON LAW COUPLE WITH ADULT CHILDREN (8) I
  11. SINGLE PARENT WITH ADULT CHILDREN (9) I
  12. OTHER (97) I

EDU

What is the highest level of schooling that you have completed?

  1. No certificate; diploma or degree (1)
  2. High school certificate or equivalent (2)
  3. Apprenticeship or trades certificate or diploma (3)
  4. College; CEGEP or other non-university certificate or diploma (4)
  5. University certificate or diploma below the bachelor level (5)
  6. University certificate; diploma or degree at bachelor's level or above (6)
  7. DK/NR (99)

QAGE20

In what year were you born? NOTE: ANSWER THE FULL YEAR, I.E. 1977 as "1977"

IF HESTITANT MOVE ONTO NEXT QUESTION

  1. Year -> AQAGE20; N4.0 [1900-1991] (77)
  2. HESITANT (9999)

QAGE2Y

If... QAGE20.EQ.9999

May I place your age into one of the following general age categories?

  1. Under 25 (1)
  2. 25-34 years (2)
  3. 35-44 years (3)
  4. 45-54 years (4)
  5. 55-64 years (5)
  6. 65-74 years (6)
  7. 75 years or older (7)
  8. (DO NOT READ) DK/NR (9)

INC

What is your annual household income from all sources before taxes?

READ LIST IF NECESSARY

  1. Less than $10,000 (1)
  2. $10,000 to $19,999 (2)
  3. $20,000 to $39,999 (3)
  4. $40,000 to $59,999 (4)
  5. $60,000 to $79,999 (5)
  6. $80,000 to $99,999 (6)
  7. $100,000 or more (7)
  8. (DO NOT READ) DK/NR (9)

MINOR [1,3]

Do you consider yourself to belong to any of the following groups? PROMPT IF NECESSARY: A member of a visible minority by virtue of your race or colour

READ LIST, CHOOSE ALL THAT APPLY

  1. A member of a visible minority (1)
  2. An Aboriginal person (2)
  3. A disabled person (3)
  4. (DO NOT READ) None (4) X
  5. (DO NOT READ) DK/NR (9) X

QEND

  1. 1 (1)

THNK [0,0]

This concludes the survey. Thank you for your participation. Good-bye.

INTRO [0,0]

Bonjour, je m'appelle... et je vous téléphone de la part des Associés de recherche EKOS. Nous effectuons un bref sondage au nom du gouvernement du Canada sur un certain nombre de questions d'actualité. La participation est tout à fait volontaire et toutes les réponses seront traitées de façon absolument confidentielle. Ce sondage s'adresse à des personnes de 16 ans et plus qui sont des résidents permanents du Canada. Puis-je commencer?

SEX

Sexe du répondant

NE PAS DEMANDER

  1. Homme (1)
  2. Femme (2)

QAWAR3

If... 1.EQ.1

OPCC TRACKING

Connaissez-vous des institutions fédérales qui aident les Canadiens à protéger leur vie privée et leurs renseignements personnels contre toute cueillette, utilisation ou divulgation faite à mauvais escient?

  1. Oui, certainement (1)
  2. Oui, vaguement (2)
  3. Non (3)
  4. NSP/PDR (9)

QAWAR4 [1,5]

If... QAWAR3.EQ.1,2

OPCC TRACKING

Quelles sont les INSTITUTIONS FÉDÉRALES que vous connaissez?

NE PAS LIRE - NE PAS SUGGÉRER

  1. COMMISSARIAT À LA PROTECTION DE LA VIE PRIVÉE DU CANADA (1)
  2. SE SOUVIENT D’UN ORGANISME SANS POUVOIR LE NOMMER (2) I
  3. ORGANISMES LIÉS À LA JUSTICE. P. EX., MINISTÈRE DE LA JUSTICE, TRIBUNAUX (3) I
  4. ORGANISMES D’EXÉCUTION DE LA LOI/AGENCES DE SÉCURITÉ, P. EX., GRC/POLICE/SCRS (4) I
  5. AGENCE DU REVENU DU CANADA (5) I
  6. ORGANISMES DE PROTECTION DES CONSOMMATEURS, AFFAIRES DES CONSOMMATEURS (6) I
  7. GOUVERNEMENT/OMBUDSMAN (7) I
  8. RHDC (8) I
  9. BANQUES (EN GÉNÉRAL) (9) I
  10. COMMISSION DES DROITS DE LA PERSONNE (10) I
  11. AUTRE (97) I
  12. Réponse AQAWAR4; C250 L2 C75 (77)
  13. NSP/PDR (99) X
  14. STATISTIQUE CANADA (11) I
  15. ORGANISMES LIÉS À LA SANTÉ DES CANADIENS, P. EX, SANTÉ CANADA, MINISTÈRES PROVINCIAUX DE LA SANTÉ (12) I
  16. 13 (13) I
  17. 14 (14) I

KNOW6

If... 1.EQ.1

OPCC TRACKING

Comment évalueriez-vous votre connaissance de vos droits en matière de vie privée en vertu des diverses lois fédérales et provinciales qui protègent vos renseignements personnels? Diriez-vous qu'elle est très mauvaise, mauvaise, ni bonne ni mauvaise, bonne ou très bonne?

  1. Très mauvaise (1)
  2. Mauvaise (2)
  3. Ni bonne ni mauvaise (3)
  4. Bonne (4)
  5. Très bonne (5)
  6. NSP/PDR (9)

IMPR6

If... 1.EQ.1

OPCC TRACKING

Dans votre vie quotidienne, comment évaluez-vous votre façon de protéger vos propres renseignements personnels? Diriez-vous qu'elle est très mauvaise, mauvaise, ni bonne ni mauvaise, bonne ou très bonne?

  1. Très mauvaise (1)
  2. Mauvaise (2)
  3. Ni bonne ni mauvaise (3)
  4. Bonne (4)
  5. Très bonne (5)
  6. NSP/PDR (9)

QAGR1 [0,0]

Veuillez indiquer dans quelle mesure vous êtes d'accord ou non avec chacun des énoncés suivants, selon une échelle de 7 points où 1 veut dire pas du tout d'accord, 7, tout à fait d'accord et le point milieu, 4, ni d'accord ni en désaccord.

DIA6B

If... 1.EQ.1

OPCC TRACKING

J'ai l'impression que mes renseignements personnels sont moins bien protégés au quotidien qu'il y a dix ans.

  1. Pas du tout d'accord 1 (1)
  2. 2 (2)
  3. 3 (3)
  4. Ni d’accord ni en désaccord 4 (4)
  5. 5 (5)
  6. 6 (6)
  7. Tout à fait d'accord 7 (7)
  8. NSP/PDR (9)

PDI6B

If... 1.EQ.1

OPCC TRACKING

La protection des renseignements personnels des Canadiens est l'une des principales questions auxquelles notre pays sera confronté au cours des dix prochaines années.

  1. Pas du tout d'accord 1 (1)
  2. 2 (2)
  3. 3 (3)
  4. Ni d’accord ni en désaccord 4 (4)
  5. 5 (5)
  6. 6 (6)
  7. Tout à fait d'accord 7 (7)
  8. NSP/PDR (9)

TQ2

Je suis persuadé que les entreprises et les organisations possèdent suffisamment de garanties de sécurité pour protéger mes renseignements personnels.

  1. 1. Pas du tout d'accord (1)
  2. 2 (2)
  3. 3 (3)
  4. 4. Ni d’accord ni en désaccord (4)
  5. 5 (5)
  6. 6 (6)
  7. 7. Tout à fait d'accord (7)
  8. NSP/PDR (9)

ENO6

If... 1.EQ.1

OPCC TRACKING

Je suis confiant d'avoir assez d'information pour savoir comment les nouvelles technologies pourraient affecter ma vie privée.

  1. 1. Pas du tout d'accord (1)
  2. 2 (2)
  3. 3 (3)
  4. 4. Ni d’accord ni en désaccord (4)
  5. 5 (5)
  6. 6 (6)
  7. 7. Tout à fait d'accord (7)
  8. NSP/PDR (9)

CLPR

Je crains que l'accent que nous mettons sur la sécurité depuis les attentats terroristes du 11-Septembre restreigne inutilement la vie privée et les libertés civiles des Canadiens.

  1. 1 Fermement en désaccord (1)
  2. 2 (2)
  3. 3 (3)
  4. 4 Ni d'accord ni en désaccord (4)
  5. 5 (5)
  6. 6 (6)
  7. 7 Fermement d'accord (7)
  8. NSP/NRP (9)

ILAW2

If... 1.EQ.1

OPCC TRACKING

Dans quelle mesure est-il important pour vous personnellement qu'il y ait des lois rigoureuses pour protéger les renseignements personnels des Canadiens? Veuillez répondre à l'aide d'une échelle de 1 à 7 où 1 veut dire pas du tout important, 7, extrêmement important et 4, plus ou moins important.

  1. 1. Pas du tout important (1)
  2. 2 (2)
  3. 3 (3)
  4. 4. Plus ou moins important (4)
  5. 5 (5)
  6. 6 (6)
  7. 7. Extrêmement important (7)
  8. NSP/PDR (9)

SYFG6

If... 1.EQ.1

OPCC TRACKING

A votre avis, dans quelle mesure le gouvernement fédéral prend-il au sérieux sa responsabilité de protéger les renseignements personnels des citoyens? Veuillez répondre selon une échelle de 1 à 7 où 1 signifie pas du tout au sérieux, 7, extrêmement au sérieux et 4, assez au sérieux.

  1. 1. Pas du tout au sérieux (1)
  2. 2 (2)
  3. 3 (3)
  4. 4. Assez au sérieux (4)
  5. 5 (5)
  6. 6 (6)
  7. 7. Extrêmement au sérieux (7)
  8. NSP/PDR (9)

SYRB6

If... 1.EQ.1

OPCC TRACKING

Et selon la même échelle, dans quelle mesure les entreprises prennent-elles au sérieux leur responsabilité de protéger les renseignements personnels des consommateurs?

  1. 1. Pas du tout au sérieux (1)
  2. 2 (2)
  3. 3 (3)
  4. 4. Assez au sérieux (4)
  5. 5 (5)
  6. 6 (6)
  7. 7. Extrêmement au sérieux (7)
  8. NSP/PDR (9)

NQ3

Dans quelle mesure êtes-vous inquiet à l’idée qu’en période d’incertitude économique, les entreprises décident de consacrer moins d’argent à la protection des renseignements personnels de leurs clients? Veuillez répondre selon une échelle de 7 points où 1 signifie pas du tout inquiet, 7, extrêmement inquiet et le point milieu, 4, moyennement inquiet.

  1. 1. Pas du tout inquiet (1)
  2. 2 (2)
  3. 3 (3)
  4. 4. Moyennement inquiet (4)
  5. 5 (5)
  6. 6 (6)
  7. 7. Extrêmement inquiet (7)
  8. NSP/PDR (9)

NQ1

Dans quelle mesure êtes-vous inquiet des effets des nouvelles technologies sur votre vie privée? Veuillez répondre selon une échelle de 7 points où 1 signifie pas du tout inquiet, 7, extrêmement inquiet et le point milieu, 4, moyennement inquiet.

  1. 1. Pas du tout inquiet (1)
  2. 2 (2)
  3. 3 (3)
  4. 4. Moyennement inquiet (4)
  5. 5 (5)
  6. 6 (6)
  7. 7. Extrêmement inquiet (7)
  8. NSP/PDR (9)

NQ2

Y a-t-il des nouvelles technologies qui vous inquiètent en particulier, du point de vue de votre vie privée? En l’occurrence, lesquelles?

  1. Réponse ANQ2; C250 L2 C75 (77)
  2. NSP/PDR (9)
  3. 1 (1) I
  4. 2 (2) I
  5. 3 (3) I
  6. 4 (4) I
  7. 5 (5) I
  8. 6 (6) I
  9. 7 (7) I
  10. 8 (8) I
  11. 97 (97) I

TQ1

Comment évaluez-vous votre aptitude à prendre les précautions qui s’imposent afin de protéger vos renseignements personnels et faire en sorte que l’utilisation d’Internet soit aussi sécuritaire que possible? Veuillez répondre selon une échelle de 7 points où 1 signifie très mauvaise, 7, très bonne et le point milieu, 4, ni bonne ni mauvaise.

  1. 1. Très mauvaise (1)
  2. 2 (2)
  3. 3 (3)
  4. 4. Ni bonne ni mauvaise (4)
  5. 5 (5)
  6. 6 (6)
  7. 7. Très bonne (7)
  8. NSP/PDR (9)

RFID6

If... 1.EQ.1

OPCC TRACKING

L'identification par radiofréquence utilise la technologie sans fil pour exercer une surveillance au moyen d'étiquettes électroniques. Insérées dans des produits, ces étiquettes permettent aux compagnies de suivre le cheminement de ces produits dans les entrepôts et les magasins. Ces étiquettes peuvent demeurer actives quand les produits ont été achetés et sont sortis du magasin. Avant le présent sondage, aviez-vous lu ou entendu quoi que ce soit au sujet des étiquettes d'identification par radiofréquence?

  1. Oui, certainement (1)
  2. Oui, peut-être (2)
  3. Non (3)
  4. NSP/PDR (9)

RFIDB

Dans quelle mesure êtes-vous inquiet des effets que cette nouvelle technologie pourrait avoir sur votre vie privée? Veuillez répondre selon une échelle de 7 points où 1 signifie pas du tout inquiet, 7, extrêmement inquiet et le point milieu, 4, moyennement inquiet.

  1. 1. Pas du tout inquiet (1)
  2. 2 (2)
  3. 3 (3)
  4. 4. Moyennement inquiet (4)
  5. 5 (5)
  6. 6 (6)
  7. 7. Extrêmement inquiet (7)
  8. NSP/PDR (9)

NANO

La nanotechnologie consiste à mettre au point du matériel ou des appareils à une échelle infiniment petite. Cette technologie va permettre, dans un proche avenir, de fabriquer des instruments de surveillance plus minuscules qu’un grain de sable. Avant le présent sondage, aviez-vous lu ou entendu dire quoi que ce soit à propos de la nanotechnologie?

  1. Oui, certainement (1)
  2. Oui, peut-être (2)
  3. Non (3)
  4. NSP/PDR (9)

NANOB

Dans quelle mesure êtes-vous inquiet des effets que cette nouvelle technologie pourrait avoir sur votre vie privée? Veuillez répondre selon une échelle de 7 points où 1 signifie pas du tout inquiet, 7, extrêmement inquiet et le point milieu, 4, moyennement inquiet.

  1. 1. Pas du tout inquiet (1)
  2. 2 (2)
  3. 3 (3)
  4. 4. Moyennement inquiet (4)
  5. 5 (5)
  6. 6 (6)
  7. 7. Extrêmement inquiet (7)
  8. NSP/PDR (9)

PGEN [0,0]

Au moyen du test génétique, on examine l’ADN d’une personne pour établir si elle a, aura ou risque de transmettre à ses descendants telle ou telle maladie.

GTEST

D’après vous, le test génétique pose-t-il des problèmes pour la vie privée?

  1. Oui (1)
  2. Non (2)
  3. NSP/PDR (9)

GTEST1F

If... GTEST.EQ.1

Quels sont les problèmes pour la vie privée qui vous inquiètent en particulier à propos du test génétique?

  1. Réponse AGTEST1F; C250 L2 C75 (77)
  2. NSP/PDR (99)
  3. 1 (1) I
  4. 2 (2) I
  5. 3 (3) I
  6. 4 (4) I
  7. 5 (5) I
  8. 6 (6) I
  9. 7 (7) I
  10. 97 (97) I

GTEST2

Vous diriez-vous, de façon générale, pour ou contre le fait que les compagnies d’assurance-maladie se servent du test génétique afin de savoir qui elles doivent assurer ou quelles primes demander? Veuillez répondre selon une échelle de 7 points où 1 signifie fermement contre, 7, fermement pour et le point milieu, 4, ni pour ni contre.

  1. 1. Fermement contre (1)
  2. 2 (2)
  3. 3 (3)
  4. 4. Ni pour ni contre (4)
  5. 5 (5)
  6. 6 (6)
  7. 7. Fermement pour (7)
  8. NSP/PDR (9)

GTEST3

Vous diriez-vous, de façon générale, pour ou contre le fait que les employeurs se servent des résultats du test génétique de quelqu’un pour prendre des décisions touchant son embauche et sa promotion? Veuillez répondre selon une échelle de 7 points où 1 signifie fermement contre, 7, fermement pour et le point milieu, 4, ni pour ni contre.

  1. 1. Fermement contre (1)
  2. 2 (2)
  3. 3 (3)
  4. 4. Ni pour ni contre (4)
  5. 5 (5)
  6. 6 (6)
  7. 7. Fermement pour (7)
  8. NSP/PDR (9)

NSP1

À quel point est-il important de tenir compte de la vie privée des gens à mesure que les gouvernements augmentent le pouvoir des organismes chargés de l’exécution de la loi et du renseignement? Veuillez répondre selon une échelle de 1 à 7 où 1 signifie pas du tout important, 7, extrêmement important et 4, plus ou moins important.

  1. 1. Pas du tout important (1)
  2. 2 (2)
  3. 3 (3)
  4. 4. Plus ou moins important (4)
  5. 5 (5)
  6. 6 (6)
  7. 7. Extrêmement important (7)
  8. NSP/PDR (9)

NSP2

À quel point êtes-vous persuadé que les nouvelles mesures de sécurité (comme à la frontière et dans les aéroports) ont pour effet de renforcer la sûreté et la sécurité? Veuillez répondre selon une échelle de 7 points où 1 signifie pas du tout persuadé, 7, entièrement persuadé et le point milieu, 4, moyennement persuadé.

  1. 1 Pas du tout persuadé (1)
  2. 2 (2)
  3. 3 (3)
  4. 4 Moyennement persuadé (4)
  5. 5 (5)
  6. 6 (6)
  7. 7 Entièrement persuadé (7)
  8. NSP/PDR (9) X

RPIN

Vous savez sans doute qu’au Canada, les organismes d’exécution de la loi et les agences de sécurité sont assujettis, en matière de vie privée, à des lois qui leur imposent des restrictions concernant la cueillette, l’entreposage et le partage des renseignements personnels. À quel point êtes-vous persuadé que les organismes d’exécution de la loi et les agences de sécurité du Canada respectent ces lois touchant la vie privée? Veuillez répondre selon une échelle de 7 points où 1 signifie pas du tout persuadé, 7, entièrement persuadé et le point milieu, 4, moyennement persuadé.

  1. 1 Pas du tout persuadé (1)
  2. 2 (2)
  3. 3 (3)
  4. 4 Moyennement persuadé (4)
  5. 5 (5)
  6. 6 (6)
  7. 7 Entièrement persuadé (7)
  8. NSP/PDR (9) X

IM1

Avez-vous déjà été victime d’un VOL D’IDENTITÉ? Par vol d’identité, on entend la cueillette et l’utilisation de vos renseignements personnels, normalement à des fins criminelles (p. ex., encaisser un chèque établi à votre nom, retirer de l’argent de votre compte bancaire, utiliser sans autorisation votre carte de crédit).

  1. Oui (1)
  2. Non (2)
  3. NSP/PDR (9)

IM2

À quel point êtes-vous inquiet, personnellement, au sujet du vol d’identité? Veuillez répondre selon une échelle de 7 points où 1 signifie pas du tout inquiet, 7, extrêmement inquiet et le point milieu, 4, moyennement inquiet.

  1. 1. Pas du tout inquiet (1)
  2. 2 (2)
  3. 3 (3)
  4. 4. Moyennement inquiet (4)
  5. 5 (5)
  6. 6 (6)
  7. 7. Extrêmement inquiet (7)
  8. NSP/PDR (9)

PIM3BAT [0,0]

Avez-vous fait l’une ou l’autre des choses suivantes dans la dernière année?

LIRE LA LISTE

IM3BAT1

Demandé à voir les renseignements personnels vous concernant que détient le gouvernement.

  1. Oui (1)
  2. Non (2)
  3. NSP/PDR (9)

IM3BAT2

Demandé à voir les renseignements personnels vous concernant que détient une entreprise.

  1. Oui (1)
  2. Non (2)
  3. NSP/PDR (9)

IM3BAT3

Commandé un exemplaire de votre dossier de crédit pour en vérifier l’exactitude.

  1. Oui (1)
  2. Non (2)
  3. NSP/PDR (9)

IM3BAT4

Refusé de révéler de vos renseignements personnels à une entreprise.

  1. Oui (1)
  2. Non (2)
  3. NSP/PDR (9)

PIM4BAT [0,0]

À quel point êtes-vous à l’aise de divulguer de vos renseignements personnels comme vos nom, adresse, numéro de téléphone, adresse courriel, date de naissance ou données financières dans chacune des situations suivantes? Veuillez répondre selon une échelle de 1 à 7 où 1 signifie pas du tout à l’aise, 7, parfaitement à l’aise et 4, ni à l’aise ni mal à l’aise.

LIRE LA LISTE

IM4BAT1

Les transactions en ligne (opérations bancaires, achat de produits ou de services sur Internet, etc.)

  1. Pas du tout à l’aise 1 (1)
  2. 2 (2)
  3. 3 (3)
  4. Ni à l’aise ni mal à l’aise 4 (4)
  5. 5 (5)
  6. 6 (6)
  7. Parfaitement à l’aise 7 (7)
  8. NSP/PDR (9)

IM4BAT2

Les programmes de fidélisation comme Air Miles, les programmes de récompense dans les stations service ou les cartes de crédit permettant d’amasser des points

  1. Pas du tout à l’aise 1 (1)
  2. 2 (2)
  3. 3 (3)
  4. Ni à l’aise ni mal à l’aise 4 (4)
  5. 5 (5)
  6. 6 (6)
  7. Parfaitement à l’aise 7 (7)
  8. NSP/PDR (9)

IM4BAT3

Les sites de socialisation comme Facebook et MySpace

  1. Pas du tout à l’aise 1 (1)
  2. 2 (2)
  3. 3 (3)
  4. Ni à l’aise ni mal à l’aise 4 (4)
  5. 5 (5)
  6. 6 (6)
  7. Parfaitement à l’aise 7 (7)
  8. NSP/PDR (9)

IM4BAT4

Les télévendeurs

  1. Pas du tout à l’aise 1 (1)
  2. 2 (2)
  3. 3 (3)
  4. Ni à l’aise ni mal à l’aise 4 (4)
  5. 5 (5)
  6. 6 (6)
  7. Parfaitement à l’aise 7 (7)
  8. NSP/PDR (9)

PIM5BAT [0,0]

Lorsque vous utilisez votre ordinateur ou créez des comptes en ligne, est-ce que vous:

IM5BAT1

Employez des mots de passe comprenant des chiffres et des lettres aléatoires qui sont difficiles à deviner?

  1. Oui (1)
  2. Non (2)
  3. Sans objet (8)
  4. NSP/PDR (9)

IM5BAT2

Employez le même mot de passe pour plusieurs comptes?

  1. Oui (1)
  2. Non (2)
  3. Sans objet (8)
  4. NSP/PDR (9)

IM5BAT3

Recherchez dans le haut ou le bas de l’écran de votre navigateur le symbole du cadenas qui vous indique que vous êtes dans une site sécurisé?

  1. Oui (1)
  2. Non (2)
  3. Sans objet (8)
  4. NSP/PDR (9)

QIM10

Utilisez-vous des mots de passe pour protéger les renseignements qui se trouvent dans vos appareils numériques portables, comme votre Blackberry ou votre téléphone cellulaire?

  1. Oui (1)
  2. Non (2)
  3. Sans objet (8)
  4. NSP/NRP (9)

NOTF1

Les renseignements personnels qu'une compagnie détient sur ses clients peuvent parfois être compromis à cause d'une activité criminelle ou de lacunes dans le système de sécurité de la compagnie. Si une compagnie faisait l'objet d'une fuite mettant en cause vos renseignements personnels, laquelle des mesures suivantes décrit le mieux votre opinion? Diriez-vous que les compagnies devraient être obligées d'informer...

LIRE LA LISTE

  1. les personnes affectées (1)
  2. les organismes gouvernementaux chargés des lois sur la protection des renseignements personnels au Canada (2)
  3. les personnes affectées et les organismes gouvernementaux (3)
  4. Pas besoin d'en informer les personnes ni les organismes gouvernementaux 4 B
  5. (NE PAS LIRE) NSP/PDR 9 B

PI71

Avez-vous déjà fait l'expérience d'un incident grave où quelqu'un a utilisé à mauvais escient vos renseignements personnels ou les a divulgués sans votre consentement (comme les renseignements d’une carte de crédit)?

  1. Oui (1)
  2. Non (2)
  3. NSP/NRP (9)

QIM1

Transportez-vous tous les jours avec vous dans votre portefeuille ou sac à main des documents sensibles comme votre carte d’assurance sociale (NAS), votre passeport ou votre certificat de naissance?

  1. Oui (1)
  2. Non (2)
  3. NSP/NRP (9)

QIM2

Surveillez-vous le moment où vos relevés bancaires ou de cartes de crédit devraient vous parvenir, à chaque mois, et vous renseignez-vous s’ils ne vous parviennent pas au bon moment?

  1. Oui (1)
  2. Non (2)
  3. NSP/NRP (9)

QIM3

Examinez-vous vos relevés bancaires ou de cartes de crédit pour vous assurer qu’ils ne comportent pas d’achats faits à votre insu?

  1. Oui (1)
  2. Non (2)
  3. NSP/NRP (9)

QIM4

Est-ce que vous déchiquetez ou détruisez les documents qui renferment de vos renseignements personnels, comme les offres de cartes de crédit, les demandes d’assurance ou de prêt, les factures et les bordereaux de cartes de crédit?

  1. Oui (1)
  2. Non (2)
  3. NSP/NRP (9)

QIM5

Craignez-vous que des entreprises ou des organisations transfèrent de vos renseignements personnels à l’extérieur du Canada pour les traiter ou les entreposer?

  1. Oui (1)
  2. Non (2)
  3. NSP/NRP (9)

QIM6

Avez-vous déjà cherché à vous renseigner sur vos droits touchant la vie privée en communiquant, par exemple, avec une organisation, en consultant un site Web ou en parcourant une publication pour y trouver de l’orientation?

  1. Oui (1)
  2. Non (2)
  3. NSP/NRP (9)

QIM7

Avez-vous déjà parcouru l’énoncé de politique d’une organisation touchant la vie privée?

  1. Oui (1)
  2. Non (2)
  3. NSP/NRP (9)

QIM8

Trouvez-vous que les partis politiques et les politiciens devraient être assujettis à une loi prévoyant les règles à suivre en vue de recueillir et de traiter les renseignements personnels vous concernant?

  1. Oui (1)
  2. Non (2)
  3. NSP/NRP (9)

DEMIN [0,0]

Voici maintenant quelques questions à des fins statistiques seulement.

HOU

Laquelle des catégories suivantes décrit le mieux votre ménage actuel? ** SI LE RÉPONDANT DIT VIVRE AVEC UN OU DES PARENTS, LE MÉNAGE EST ALORS 02 (UN ADULTE AVEC ENFANT(S)) OU 04 (UN COUPLE MARIÉ OU EN UNION DE FAIT, AVEC ENFANT(S)).

  1. Une personne vivant seule (1)
  2. Un adulte avec enfant(s) (2)
  3. Un couple marié ou en union de fait, sans enfant (3)
  4. Un couple marié ou en union de fait, avec enfant(s) (4)
  5. Deux personnes ou plus sans liens de parenté (5)
  6. Vivant avec de la famille autre que les parents (6)
  7. Plus d'un adulte avec enfant(s) (7)
  8. AUTRE (77)
  9. NSP/PDR (99)
  10. 8 (8) I
  11. 9 (9) I
  12. 97 (97) I

EDU

Quel est le niveau de scolarité le plus élevé que vous ayez atteint?

  1. Aucun certificat, grade ou diplôme (1)
  2. Certificat d’études secondaires ou l’équivalent (2)
  3. Certificat ou diplôme d’apprenti ou d’artisan (3)
  4. Certificat ou diplôme d’études collégiales ou autres, non universitaires (4)
  5. Certificat ou diplôme d’études universitaires inférieures au baccalauréat (5)
  6. Certificat, grade ou diplôme universitaire du niveau du baccalauréat ou supérieur (6)
  7. NSP/NRP (99)

QAGE20

En quelle année êtes-vous né? NOTE: INSCRIRE L'ANNÉE AU COMPLET, P. EX., "1977"

EN CAS D'HÉSITATION PASSER A LA QUESTION SUIVANTE

  1. Année [1900-1991] (77)
  2. HÉSITATION (9999)

QAGE2Y

If... QAGE20.EQ.9999

Puis-je vous situer dans l'un des groupes d'âges suivants?

  1. Moins de 25 ans (1)
  2. 25-34 ans (2)
  3. 35-44 ans (3)
  4. 45-54 ans (4)
  5. 55-64 ans (5)
  6. 65-74 ans (6)
  7. 75 ans ou plus (7)
  8. (NE PAS LIRE) NSP/PDR (9)

INC

Quel est le revenu annuel de votre ménage, de toute provenance et avant impôts?

LIRE LA LISTE AU BESOIN

  1. Moins de 10 000 $ (1)
  2. 10 000 $ à 19 999 $ (2)
  3. 20 000 $ à 39 999 $ (3)
  4. 40 000 $ à 59 999 $ (4)
  5. 60 000 $ à 79 999 $ (5)
  6. 80 000 $ à 99 999 $ (6)
  7. 100 000 $ ou plus (7)
  8. (NE PAS LIRE) NSP/PDR (9)

MINOR [1,3]

Estimez-vous que vous appartenez à l'un ou l'autre des groupes suivants? SOUFFLER AU BESOIN: Un membre d'une minorité visible en raison de votre race ou de la couleur de votre peau

LIRE LA LISTE; ACCEPTER TOUTE RÉPONSE PERTINENTE

  1. Membre d'une minorité visible (1)
  2. Autochtone (2)
  3. Personne handicapée (3)
  4. (NE LISEZ PAS) Aucun de ces groupes (4) X
  5. (NE LISEZ PAS) NSP/NRP (9) X

QEND

  1. 1 (1)

THNK [0,0]

Voilà qui met fin au sondage. Merci de votre participation. Au revoir.