Your privacy rights

In Canada, the right to privacy is rooted in the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms. The Charter does not specifically mention privacy or the protection of personal information. However, it does afford protection under Section 7 (the right to life, liberty and the security of the person), and Section 8 (the right to be secure against unreasonable search or seizure).

There are also a number of laws that protect your privacy rights by setting out rules for the way your personal information is handled by both governments and organizations. For example, in general, your personal information can only be collected, used and disclosed with your knowledge—and often your consent—for legitimate purposes. It must also be stored, shared and disposed of in a way that keeps it secure and confidential.

The Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada is responsible for overseeing two federal privacy laws:

Explore the links on this page to learn more about your privacy rights under the two federal privacy laws protect them.

Businesses and your personal information

Learn about your privacy rights when you interact with businesses subject to the federal private sector privacy law.

The Federal Government and your personal information

Learn about your privacy rights with federal government institutions.

Raising your privacy concern with an organization

Helpful tips for challenging an organization about how it is handling your personal information.

10 Tips for Protecting Personal Information

Find advice to help individuals better protect their personal information.

What to consider when reading a privacy policy

Tips for individuals on reading and better understanding privacy policies.

Privacy quiz

Try our privacy quiz to find out how well you know your privacy rights.

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